Life As It Is | The Life and Times of a Texas Photojournalist » The life and times of a Texas photojournalist

On Assignment | The Steiner’s Outdoor Oasis | 225

In January, I spent a sunset with Chris and Nancy Steiner, sitting on their deck next to the fire, chatting about this and that. When the Steiners moved into their home, Chris designed a special deck for them that overlooks the nature preserve behind their backyard. It was built last summer, and they said they have gotten some wonderful use out of it since.

The deck is fantastical, to say the least, and it was beautiful watching the sun set, then the lights twinkle on the deck as I took photos of the space.

Chris and Nancy Steiner

Chris and Nancy Steiner's unique deck, designed by Chris, stands behind their Baton Rouge home on Mon., Jan. 2, 2011. Chris said he spent months on the design before the deck was built this past summer. (Photo by Erin Parker / 225)

… When I “grow up” and move into my dream home, I’d like a deck like this.

kimMay 8, 2012 - 10:24 am

I am so unbelievably jealous of this outdoor area. We have a nice one, but nowhere near this nice.

On Assignment | Port Hudson Organics | 225

CSA member Patty Rumfellow, from left, picks mustard greens with Will and Thais Perkins at the Port Hudson Organics farm in Zachary, La. on Sat., Feb. 25, 2012. The Perkins

CSA member Patty Rumfellow, from left, picks mustard greens with Will and Thais Perkins at the Port Hudson Organics farm in Zachary, La. on Sat., Feb. 25, 2012. The Perkins' own and operate the Port Hudson Organics CSA, which allows their 40 families to visit the farm weekly, help with the farm and pick their own produce for the week. (Photo by Erin Parker / 225)

When we lived in Tennessee, I was all about visiting the Nashville Farmer’s Market, especially since it was so close to my workplace and was open year-round. When we moved back to Louisiana, I wondered what it would be like, and I have been pleasantly surprised.

I’ve even had a few assignments based around local produce. This one was a little different, though, as I had the opportunity to drive out to Port Hudson Organics in Zachary, La., one Saturday afternoon to take some photographs.

There, I was met by owners Will and Thais Perkins, as well as a community supported agriculture (CSA) member, Patty Rumfellow. We walked the grounds, and I snapped a few photos of them picking mustard greens, as well as fresh lettuce.

It was a delightful experience, and being out there made me want to plant my own garden or join a CSA to enjoy the freshness and deliciousness of locally grown produce.

 

For more information on Port Hudson Organics and their CSA, visit their blog.

To learn more about Community Supported Agriculture in Baton Rouge, read Maggie Heyn Richardson’s article Plow Shares.

 

Friday Favorites

It’s MAY, y’all. May. The fifth month of the year.

Goodness.

Next month, I’ll reach my one-year anniversary of being back in Louisiana. I’m enjoying it all, including the crazy hot temps and the afternoon thunderstorms that popped up this week.

I’m also enjoying these following links:

Photography

Odds & Ends

Happy (almost) weekend, y’all!

What are YOU loving this week?

On Assignment | Grace Notes Music Studio | inRegister

Back in February, I attended a group violin class with inRegister writer, Jen Bayhi-Gennaro. Like some freelance assignments, I was unsure what to expect out of the class, but I was excited to be in attendance.

As a child, I took violin lessons and spent one night a week at the Suzuki Building on the University of Memphis South Campus for group classes. During those classes, you were grouped with other children who were at the same skill level as you, and you practiced the music you were learning as a team. … To this day, I can play a Vivaldi concerto perfectly because I was in the same class for two years in a row. (Hi, taking it a little slower than everyone else.)

This group class was very similar, and I reminisced about my time as a young violinist as Neil Nelson conducted the students and his wife, Genny, played the cello along with the group.

Neil Denton, center, leads a group violin class on Thurs., Feb. 16, 2012 at Grace Notes Music Studio in Beauregard Town. The Grace Notes Music Studio opened in 2008 and teaches all ages how to play specific instruments. (Photo by Erin Parker / inRegister)

Neil Nelson, center, leads a group violin class on Thurs., Feb. 16, 2012 at Grace Notes Music Studio in Beauregard Town. The Grace Notes Music Studio opened in 2008 and teaches all ages how to play specific instruments. (Photo by Erin Parker / inRegister)

 

To read Jen’s article on the Grace Notes Music Studio, check out inRegister online.

To learn more about the Grace Notes Music Studio, visit their website.

On Assignment | Dr. Christopher Austin | 225

Dr. Christopher Allen, a scientist at LSU, stands inside the Museum of Natural History on the Baton Rouge Campus on Thurs., Feb. 9, 2012. Allen travels two to three months a year and recently discovered the world

Dr. Christopher Allen, a scientist at LSU, stands inside the Museum of Natural History on the Baton Rouge Campus on Thurs., Feb. 9, 2012. Allen recently discovered the world's smallest vertebrate, a tiny frog in Papua New Guinea. (Photo by Erin Parker / 225)

It was early on a Thursday morning in February when I met up with Dr. Christopher Austin in one of my least favorite places on LSU’s campus — the Museum of Natural History. Part of the art department meets in the same building as the museum, and because of this, I spent more than enough time in the museum itself, using the animals for still-life drawings and, in general, being freaked out by the various species on display.

My assignment with Dr. Christopher Austin was to get some nice portraits of him in the museum, since we didn’t have the opportunity to photograph Austin in the field. Austin, a local herpetologist, travels to Papua New Guinea two to three months a year, studying how the island became so diverse in wildlife.

On a recent trip, he and his colleagues discovered a frog that is believed to be the world’s smallest vertebrate on record, called Paedophryne amauensis, completely by chance.

 

To read more about Dr. Christopher Austin, what he does and how they discovered the Paedophryne amauensis, check out Jeff Roedel’s article Real Backbone.

To learn more about Austin and what he has done, as well as to listen to the Paedophryne amauensis, visit his website.